28 Aug 2014

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian First Drive Impressions

I'm driving this Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian for the next week.  Here's a short review

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian
2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian
Why did I book a Mitsubishi L200 press car?  Well, because it's different, and because I've always liked the look of pick-ups, and thought I'd see if it would make an off the wall alternative to an SUV.

The first thing you notice is how big it is. At 5,185mm it's as long as a Mercedes S-Class, although this, the Barbarian, does have an extended load platform.  The Barbarian is almost the top of the range and comes with all the usual gizmos you'd expect in any car.

It's a damn fine looking thing with lots of character and a commanding presence.  Open the driver's door and the interior looks pretty good too.

Climb in and you'll see it's got electric windows, cruise control, satnav, DAB, Bluetooth, leather seats and, strangely for a car like this, an automatic gearbox.

You also notice that the driving position is ideal for those with short legs and long arms - perhaps designed for those who might buy one - but not so much for those of more normal proportions. I found the steering wheel too far away, and it only adjusts up and down.

The seats look good but have no lumbar support, or even much in the way of support generally. They feel like leather-clad church pews.

The infotainment system is a touchscreen Kenwood unit and has too much of an aftermarket feel, although to be fair it's not much different to those found in many other low volume Japanese cars such as the Subaru BRZ.  The sound quality from the speakers is dire.

The engine is a 2.5 litre turbo-diesel with 175bhp and 258lb ft of torque. It has plenty of grunt and pulls the L200 along well.  The auto gearbox might only have 5-speeds but it doesn't feel like it needs more and the time taken to change gear, and the frequency it changes is better than in some road cars I've driven.  Despite a bit of gruffness the engine and gearbox work well and make the car feel quicker than it is. 0-60 takes 12.1 seconds but it feels faster.

The L200 has a payload capacity of 1,120kg and a towing capacity of 2,700kg.  Because of this it has leaf spring rear suspension which makes for a bouncy ride. The impressively long suspension travel is designed for practicality rather than handling and as such the Barbarian leans in corners like Land Rovers of old.

Mind you it does off-road well. I took it down a local green lane with some seriously big ruts and bumps and the L200 took them all in its stride.

It strives to present an image of a fun, interesting car that's also a practical pick up.  It is very practical but you'd be disappointed if you bought one as an alternative to an SUV.

Having said that I like it. It has so much character I can forgive its shortcomings.

Stats


Price - £28,798
Engine - 2.5 litre, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, diesel 
Transmission - 5-speed automatic
0-60mph - 12.1 seconds 
Top speed - 111 mph 
Power - 175 bhp 
Torque - 258 lb ft/400 Nm 
Economy - 32.1 mpg 
CO2 - 208 g/km 
Kerb weight - 1,865 kg
2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian
2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian
2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian
2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian
2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian
2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian

2014 Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian

By Matt Hubbard


27 Aug 2014

The 2015 Volvo XC90 Is Finally Revealed - Stats, Price & Photos

After the longest build up for almost any SUV Volvo has finally revealed the all new XC90. But why is this so important for Volvo?

2015 Volvo XC90
2015 Volvo XC90
Twelve years ago Volvo was known for building boxy estates and saloons.  They weren't sexy cars.  They were safe cars. The two didn't mix.

Then along came the XC90, and everything changed for the Swedish company.  The XC90 was its first SUV and it was a hit.  As far as an SUV can be sexy this was safe and sexy.

Ford, who'd owned Volvo since 1999 sold the company to Geely in 2008. The Chinese company allowed Volvo to flourish, producing a range of good looking cars with a unique identity, although they were still based on Ford chassis' and mainly used Ford based engines.

In 2013 three Volvo concept vehicles were revealed. They came from the pen of Volvo's senior vice-president of design Thomas Ingenlath and looked sensational.  These concepts foreshadowed all future Volvo design not just on the surface but underneath.

The concepts are based on Volvo's flexible new chassis architecture which, unlike VW's MQB, allows  cars of all sizes to be designed and brought to market quickly. In addition the power plants are Volvo's own range of Drive-E engines.

The reason the XC90 is so significant for Volvo is that it is the first all new, entirely Volvo product in a generation.  And it should sell well. The XC90 was a sales success but as it's aged the newer, smaller XC60 SUV has overtaken it as the best selling Volvo.

All engines in the XC90 will be Drive-E engines. Petrol or diesel they're all 4-cylinder, 2-litres. I've already tested the D4 (in the XC60) and liked its power, economy and smoothness.

The range topping engines in the XC90 are the D5 (diesel) and T8 (petrol).  The T8 is a plug-in hybrid which is boosted by a turbocharger and a supercharger. It produces a stonking 394bhp and 640Nm/472lb ft of torque yet returns 110mpg and produces 60g/km of CO2.  The D5 is a turbocharged diesel and has 225bhp and 470Nm/347lb ft of torque.

Through a combination of construction technique and materials and technology Volvo reckons the new XC90 will be the safest SUV on the market.  Check out this video for evidence of that.

The only prices revealed so far are for the D5 AWD Momentum, which costs £45,000 and can be ordered in October and delivered in May 2015, and the special edition First Edition D5 which comes with every option box ticked and costs £68,000.  The First Edition is limited to 1,927 (to commemorate Volvo's founding in 1927) and can be ordered from 3 September only via Volvo's global website here.

I'll come back with a review once I've had the chance to drive one of the new XC90s.

2013 Volvo XC90 D5 review
2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

2015 Volvo XC90

By Matt Hubbard



26 Aug 2014

Reading To Paris And Back In A Volvo XC60 D4 (On One Tank Of Fuel)

This summer we took a short break in Paris. When we booked the trip I decided to drive as flying would be too much of a pain with the various rail transfers for such a short distance.  I'd also never used the Eurotunnel before so fancied trying that out.  What car to take, though?

I could have taken my own car but this was a good opportunity to evaluate another car over a distance and with my son, Eddie, on board it would highlight how suitable it was for children.

The Volvo XC60 is a decent SUV that has a lovely interior, a wafty ride, comfortable seats and now comes with Volvo's all-new D4 engine.  A Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red it was then.
Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red

Day one saw an 8am start for an 11.50am check in time on the Eurotunnel.  The M4, M25 and M20 were relatively traffic free and I used the adaptive cruise control for 90% of the journey.  The car had a manual gearbox but adaptive cruise still works well with it.

The seats are great in Volvos but the R-Design's leather, electrically adjustable seat (the passenger side is manually adjustable) was super comfortable.  Eddie spent the morning in the back, watching a movie on the headrest mounted DVD player.  The car didn't come with headphones so he plugged his iPhone earphones in. They were a bit too quiet but he was happy enough.

The car has plenty of storage space. The boot is big and the glove box is pretty cavernous. There are cupholders ahead of the armrest and there's a cubby under the 'rest itself as well as the door pockets.

I kept myself entertained with digital radio and a playlist I'd put together for the trip streamed via Bluetooth from my iPhone to the excellent sound system.

We arrived at Folkestone ahead of schedule and were put on an earlier train.  You check in whilst in the car and are waved through and on to the train itself where you park up and stay in the car.

The XC60's electronics shut down after 10 minutes (to preserve the battery no doubt) but the journey under the English Channel is only 20 minutes long.

In Calais and the Volvo's adaptability reveals itself.  A twist of the indicator stalk and km/h is shown in the digital dash.  A couple of sub-menus in the infotainment system and the headlights are set to driving on the right.

And so to Paris. 180 miles and driving on the wrong side of the road. My brain needs rewiring but the car is so easy to drive it lets me recalibrate without undue interference.

The D4 engine is strong. It's a 2-litre turbodiesel with 181bhp and 280lb ft of torque.  In the D4 power is fed through the front wheels.  This is fine for economy but highlights the torque and lack of locking differential. It does suffer from torque steer.  An e-diff might have been a sensible option.

This doesn't matter on the motorway though. The ride is super-soft, the controls well placed and the infoscreen and dials clear and easy to read and use.

We arrive at our hotel having covered 310 miles.  The fuel gauge is showing just over half full and the XC60 has returned over 44mpg.  The car reckons there's another 430 miles in the tank.  In the UK we cruised at 70mph but in France the limit is 130km/h so we travelled at 80mph.

Day two was Disneyland, which was 10 miles from the hotel. Eight members of my family were at the hotel so Ed rode up front and my two nieces, eight and six, were in the back.  The XC60's integrated child seats perfectly suited them, and there was space to sit someone else in between.

Day three was Paris itself and we left the Volvo at the hotel and used the dreaded public transport.

Day four of our short trip saw Eddie and me leave at 9am bound for Calais.

The XC60 soaks up the miles.  The engine is smooth and quiet and the various driver aids (most of which are options) are useful.  Again we arrived early and were put on an earlier train.

The M20 was pretty busy but the M25 was another level of hell.  It was nose to tail all the way around to the M3 where we dived off to escape the misery.  The car's stop/start function saved a few mpgs but economy suffered as we crawled along for mile after mile.

Near Gatwick we had 60 miles left to go and the trip computer reckoned there were 65 miles in the tank.  I was absolutely bricking it and drove as frugally as possible.

Having a manual gearbox means you can eke out the fuel but we were still flying too close to the wind for my liking.

When we got home the car had just 10 miles left in the tank.  But we'd done it. 5 miles west of Reading, Berkshire to the suburbs of Paris and back on one tank of fuel.  Impressive stuff.

I was ambivalent towards the XC60 before we set off, preferring the V60, but after 630 miles and four days I'd grown to love it.  Eddie liked it too - a lot.  It is a very likeable car.

Watch my video diary of the trip and the car here

You can see the XC60 D4 R-Design Lux's price and stats here.
Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red
Eddie in the back seat

Breakfast!

Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red
On the Eurotunnel

Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red
Hello!

Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red
No need to headlight stickers in the XC60

Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red
Cruising...

Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red
Paris!

Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red
Ed loves his Pink Floyd t-shirt

The XC60 is big but not too big for parking spaces

Eddie pointing out that you're not meant to get out of the car in the Eurotunnel

Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red
Reading to Paris and back on one tank


By Matt Hubbard









18 Aug 2014

2014 Volvo XC60 D4 First Drive Impressions

I'll be driving 900 miles in four days in the Volvo XC60 so will it live up to its reputation as a refined, economical cruiser?

2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux
2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux

This Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux in Passion Red turned up last Friday. It's now Monday and I've only driven 70 miles in it, mainly sub-5 mile journeys on a mix of A, B and unclassified roads.

On Tuesday my son and I will be driving to France, in convoy with Speedmonkey's Colin.  Aware of the importance of the new D4, the first of the Drive-E range of engines which are made in Sk√∂vde,  I wanted to see if it really is as economical and refined as Volvo say it is.

So far so good. After all those short journeys, usually with the hammer down, it's returned 37mpg.  It's got a decent turn of speed too. This car has a 6-speed manual gearbox which is suited more to smooth rather than fast changes - getting really nerdy it feels more like a BMW than Porsche gearbox.

The car's 295lb ft of torque is really felt in the mid and higher gears where the muscular swell of power means you can bring it right down to 2,000rpm in, say, fourth and it'll pick up quickly thereafter. Most drivers will be surprised at how fast it can go.

The steering and handling has been criticised by some motoring journalists but that's ignoring 99% of buyers who won't notice such subtleties. The steering is fine and it's pretty good at hustling, although you have to set up the car's bulk using road positioning, speed and steering angle prior to a corner if you want to give it the beans.

The only let-down for me is the fact it is front wheel drive.  I can understand why Volvo has done this, to highlight the efficient engine, but because it has quite a bit of power torque steer is an issue.  An e-diff would make it more manageable.  This is felt even at moderate acceleration so it's not just a journalist whinging about something that the typical driver would never normally notice.

The ride is mellifluously, wonderfully smooth. All those hours on Volvo's test tracks have paid dividends.

The interior is rather lovely. Volvo makes better interiors than the Germans and in R-Design Lux spec leather everything is the order of the day.  My son may be sitting in the back on the way to France as there's a DVD player in each headrest.

Keep an eye my Twitter account for pics and info about the car from our trip to France.  I'm aiming to do the entire trip on one tank of fuel.

Stats


Price - £35,160 
Engine - 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, diesel 
Transmission - 6-speed manual
0-60mph - 8.5 seconds 
Top speed - 130 mph 
Power - 181 bhp 
Torque - 295 lb ft/400 Nm 
Economy - 60.1 mpg 
CO2 - 117 g/km 
Kerb weight - 1,816 kg 
2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux
2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux

2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux
2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux

2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux
The boot is this big. The powered tailgate scares the crap out of Speedmonkey Dog

2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux
TVs in the rear headrests

2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux
2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux

2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux
2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux

2014 Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Lux
37mpg over several short journeys is very good

By Matt Hubbard


12 Aug 2014

The First New Jaguar E-Type Lightweight In Fifty Years - Full Specs And Gallery

Jaguar Land Rover's Special Operations division has built a brand new E-Type Lightweight, which will be the first of six.

2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
In 1963 eighteen Special GT (aka Lightweight) E-Types were intended and allocated chassis numbers but only twelve were constructed. Now, in 2014, Jaguar has assembled a team of engineers to hand build the remaining six.

Working from the Browns Lane factory but utilising engineers from across the JLR group the first prototype has been finished and will revealed at Pebble Beach, California on 14 August.

The car weighs 1,000kg and is powered by a 3.8 litre 6-cylinder engine which produces 340bhp.

Here's some info, including full tech specs, from the press release plus a full gallery of the new E-Type Lightweight.
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
The bodyshell

The core component of the Lightweight E-type is its aluminium bodyshell. This material replaced the steel of the production E-type in the quest to shed weight – some 250lb (114kg) were saved compared with the standard car.

Despite the 50-year gap, the aluminium build of the six new Lightweights gives them an immediate affinity with the current Jaguar range, the F-TYPE and XJ models being built to exacting standards with aluminium bodies for exactly the same reason. In fact, Jaguar is now the world's leading manufacturer of aluminium-bodied cars and the company has unrivalled experience in the relatively new field of applying aluminium technology to volume production cars.

So when tasked with the job of recreating the Lightweight E-type's aluminium body, today's Jaguar engineers could relate at once to what their predecessors had achieved 50 years before. However, despite the enormous advances in technology since the early 1960s, the decision was taken not to incorporate modern materials or fixing methods. While high-strength aluminium alloys and bonded structures would have been invisible, they would not have been true to the original design – and nor would they have conformed to the FIA’s homologation requirements for historic racing.

Instead, today's advanced technology was deployed to ensure the highest quality and most faithful rendition of the Lightweight E-type's open two-seater body components. Using state-of-the-art scanning technology, the inner and outer surfaces of a Lightweight bodyshell were digitally mapped.

The resulting massively detailed scan, which recorded dimensions and shape down to a fraction of a millimetre, was then assessed by Jaguar's technicians to validate how the body was assembled back in the 1960s, how consistent the structure was side-to-side, and how it could be engineered today to produce the highest quality result for the Lightweight E-type project.

As this digital capturing process gave Jaguar's engineers complete control over the Lightweight E-type body's 230 individual components, their shapes could then be optimised before the data was sent to the tool room at Jaguar's Whitley engineering centre. Even panels which are unseen within the structure have been faithfully reproduced. To ensure absolute symmetry, one side of the scanned body was used as the datum, this being 'flipped' to produce an identical condition on the opposite side.

Additionally, before being signed-off, the outer ‘A-surface’ CAD scan was transferred to Jaguar's design department where the surface geometry was finalised. All this work ensured that the tooling from which the majority of the new body parts are produced is as accurate as possible.

Approximately 75 per cent of the panels are made in-house at Whitley, just a few very large pressings being supplied by external specialists using Jaguar-designed tooling. The grades of aluminium used for both the under-structure and surface panels are almost identical in mechanical properties to those used for the original 1963 Lightweight E-types. The body is completed to original Lightweight E-type Chassis no. 12 condition, by which time Jaguar had added some additional strengthening in key areas of the shell. The aluminium body is then completed by the addition of an aluminium bonnet, doors and trunk lid. As with the original cars, an aluminium hard top is standard.

The development of the body-in-white tooling was undertaken by the same department that builds all Jaguar Land Rover prototype vehicles, so the expertise applied to the project was world-class. The build process and assembly procedures were initially proved out on Car Zero; this is effectively an engineering prototype and will not carry one of the six Lightweight chassis numbers.

For the Lightweight E-type project, Jaguar's engineers created a 'grey book' of the type used during the development of new production Jaguars. This internal document sets out the required quality standards in terms of bodyshell fit-and-finish and ensures a consistency of build quality for all six new Lightweight E-types.

A roll-over cage is fitted as standard, and the body includes mounting points for a detachable front extension which is available as an extra. The cars are built in a form suitable for FIA homologation for historic motorsport purposes (see full specification).

The engine and drivetrain

The Lightweight E-type was powered by a highly developed version of Jaguar's straight-six XK engine which, with its chain-driven twin overhead camshafts and aluminium head with hemispherical combustion chambers, remained highly advanced in 1963 even though it had first been seen in the XK 120 as far back as 1948.

It was this engine that had powered the C- and D-types to five Le Mans victories in the 1950s, and the unit developed for the Lightweight E-type is based on the 3,868cc (236 cu in) engine which, in the D-type, had won Le Mans in 1957. A similar big valve 'wide angle' cylinder head is used, but in place of the D-type's cast iron block, Jaguar introduced an aluminium block for the Lightweight E-type which substantially reduced the amount of weight over the front wheels. This also features in the present-day car, with pressed-in steel liners.

Another major feature transferred from the D-type is the dry sump lubrication system. This uses a scavenge pump to collect oil from the sump and return it to a separate oil tank in the underbonnet area. This eliminates oil surge during fast cornering and consequent risk of damage to the engine's bearings, and also allows a greater quantity of oil to be carried.

The compression ratio is 10:1 and today's car is supplied with three 45DCO3 Weber carburettors. These were homologated by Jaguar for the Lightweight E-type in addition to a Lucas mechanical fuel injection system – which is being offered to customers as a cost-option (and which is fitted to Car Zero). The exhaust manifold is a steel fabrication and leads the exhaust gasses into twin pipes which take them through a centre silencer box to the rear of the car, where the exhaust system ends in twin polished tail pipes.

Whether carburettors or fuel injection is specified, brake horsepower is well over 300, and with torque in the region of 280lb ft at 4500 rpm, the car is endowed with rapid acceleration from comparatively low engine revs – a traditional feature of Jaguar racing engines.

A 12 volt negative earth electrical system is used, and the engine benefits from a modern inertia-type starter motor. The water and oil radiators are in aluminium alloy, there is an aluminium expansion tank for the coolant, and the fuel tank is mesh-filled for safety.

The power is transferred to the road via a lightweight, low inertia flywheel, a single-plate clutch and a Jaguar close-ratio, manual four-speed all-synchromesh gearbox as used by the Lightweight E-type in period. A variety of final drive ratios are available, all with the Powr-Lok limited-slip differential, but a 3.31:1 ratio is supplied as standard.

Suspension, steering and brakes


The twin wishbone front suspension and independent wide-based wishbone rear suspension (where the drive-shaft serves as the upper link) are set-up according to period racing practice, with uprated shock absorbers controlling the torsion bar springs (front) and the four coil springs (rear).

The steering is the excellent standard E-type rack-and-pinion, with a traditional wood-rim wheel for the driver. Larger (12.25in) brake discs are fitted at the front, with the rear brakes being standard E-type. No servo is fitted.

The 15in diameter wheels are period type in the correct 'perforated' style, and like the originals are cast in magnesium alloy. Rim width is 7in front, 8in rear. Dunlop racing tyres are fitted, 6.00 section front, 6.50 section rear, both in CR65 compound.

Final assembly


The monocoque bodyshell is built at Whitley where it is mated to its tubular engine sub-frame – which is stiffened with gussets as for the original Lightweight – and then shipped to Jaguar's Gaydon facility for painting. From there it is then taken to Jaguar Heritage at Browns Lane where the car is built up with powertrain, suspension, brakes, steering, electrical items, instrument panel and soft trim.

This process takes place in a dedicated area close to where the original Lightweight E-types were assembled in 1963/64, and the work is undertaken by highly skilled technicians used to assembling extremely complex JLR prototypes.

It is at this stage that personal consultation with the customer dictates the final specification for each individual car – no two of which are expected to be identical.

Car Zero underwent a 15-day shake-down period at Jaguar Land Rover's test facility at Gaydon to prove out the car's dynamics and establish optimum suspension settings. This involved Mike Cross, Jaguar's Chief Engineer, Vehicle Integrity. Jaguar's engineers even established a 'design verification plan' for the car, just as they would do for an entirely new model. Each of the six new Lightweights will go through shake-down tests to ensure that they meet the required standards in terms of braking, handling and steering.

2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
LIGHTWEIGHT E-TYPE SPECIFICATION

Engine System

Engine: Aluminium six-cylinder block, wide-angle cylinder head, dry sumplubrication, lightweight low-inertia flywheel

Displacement: 236.0 cu in (3,868cc)

Bore/Stroke: 3.46in/4.17in (88.0mm/106.0mm)

Valvetrain: 2 valves per cylinder, DOHC

Compression ratio: 10:1

Carburettors: Triple 45DCO3 Weber

Injection (optional): Lucas mechanical, 6.25in (158.7mm) butterfly trumpets

Crankshaft: Steel with steel H-section con rods

Power: 340hp/253.5kW @ 6500rpm

Torque: 280lbs ft/380Nm @ 4500rpm

Fuel tank: Mesh-filled 14-gallon (64-litre) capacity

Fuel pump: Standard E-type

Transmission and Driveline

Transmission: Jaguar 4-speed all-synchro close-ratio gearbox

Final drive casing: Cast iron, Powr-Lok limited slip differential, axle ratio 3.31:1

Gearbox oil: Castrol

Clutch: Single dry plate

Suspension and Steering

Front: Double wishbone, LWE torsion bars, uprated anti-roll bar

Rear: Jaguar independent rear suspension lower wishbones/driveshaft links, radius arms, anti-roll bar (C/O Standard E-type rear springs with uprated damper assemblies)

Steering: Standard E-type rack-and-pinion, adjustable steering column

Brakes

Brake discs (front): 12in Dia (305mm)

Brake discs (rear): 11.25in Dia (286mm)

Handbrake: Production E-type

Wheels and Tyres

Magnesium disc
wheels: Front: 15in x 7.0J, Rear 15in x 8.0J

Tyres: Dunlop (Front - 6.00L15 CR65, Rear – 6.50L15 CR65)

Electrical

Battery: 12v - 62 amp / hour

System: 12v negative-earth

Lighting: Tungsten headlamps and standard rear tail-lamps

Ignition: Electronic

Instruments: Smiths Industries

Generator: Production E-type

Starter: Production E-type

Control Box: Production E-type

Wiper motor and blades: Production E-type

Exhaust and Cooling

Exhaust: Fabricated steel manifold, steel exhaust system with centre silencer box and twin polished tail pipes

Cooling: Aluminium E-type radiator, aluminium expansion header tank, engine oil cooler, oil sump tank

Overview

Length: 175.3in (4,453mm)

Width: 66.9in (1,700mm)

Height: 46.5in (1,181mm)

Weight: 2204.6lbs (1,000kg)

Wheelbase: 96.1in (2,440mm)

Front Track: 50.0in (1,270mm)

Rear Track: 55.0in (1,397mm)

BODY TRIM & HARDWARE

Body in white & closures

Aluminium monocoque with stiffened front sub-frame for race engines above 300bhp

Riveted and welded aluminium construction

Aluminium body closures (bonnet/doors/trunk-lid)

Aluminium detachable hard top roof

21 louvre bonnet air intakes

Black powder-coated roll cage

Front brake cooling ducts integrated with bonnet structure

Exterior trim

Side bonnet-release handles

‘Long range’ aluminium quick release fuel cap

Body colour cabin ventilation air intakes

Protective car cover (non-waterproof)

Centre bonnet catch

Oval door mirror upgrade

Interior Trim

Aluminium bucket seats with increased backrest angle and padded cushions

Rear-view mirror

Leather selection from Connolly palette

Wood-rimmed steering wheel

Aluminium gear knob and standard hand brake

Machined metal toggle and push button starter

Five-point seat belt

Black instrument panel with glove box

Bonnet and boot stands

Glass house

Clear laminated front screen

Perspex side windows and rear screen

Manual slide side windows
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight

2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
2014 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight
By Matt Hubbard